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Arkansas State remains closed on Wednesday, Feb. 1

Arkansas State University will remain closed on Wednesday, Feb. 1, due to a major winter storm.

With approximately a half inch of ice accumulation from overnight sleet, temperatures hovering in the high 20s and another round of wintery mix predicted for Tuesday afternoon, all on-campus classes are cancelled for Feb. 1, and all academic and business offices remain closed.

For Wednesday, the following on-campus services will operate under their established, abbreviated hours:

  • The Reng Student Union will open for on-campus student usage at 8 a.m., closing at 8 p.m.
  • Dining Services will operate on brunch hours.

The following facilities will be closed:

  • The Dean B. Ellis Library (online resources available 24/7)
  • Red WOLF Center

With the wintery mix forecast to end on Wednesday and a potential warming above 32 degrees, an evaluation of campus roads and surfaces will be made on Wednesday to determine if campus can re-open for regular business for Feb. 2.

For ongoing updates, please check our website and the university’s official social media accounts.

Provost’s Inclement Weather Policy
Emergency Contact
University Police
870-972-2093

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Pre-Professional Studies

Pre-professional students are those who are planning on entering a health-care related professional school after leaving Arkansas State University. Pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, pre-physical therapy, and pre-occupational therapy are "states of mind" rather than majors.

Students in pre-professional studies must plan their course of study with care. Advisors are available to assist students; however, the responsibility for selecting courses and meeting admission requirements rests with the individual student who must plan and select courses consistent with the program requirements. 


There are several different career paths available:


  • Pre-Chiropractic

    What do Chiropractors do?

    "Chiropractors, also known as doctors of chiropractic or chiropractic physicians, diagnose and treat patients with health problems of the musculoskeletal system and treat the effects of those problems on the nervous system and on general health. Many chiropractic treatments deal specifically with the spine and the manipulation of the spine. Chiropractic is based on the principle that spinal joint misalignments interfere with the nervous system and can result in lower resistance to disease and many different conditions of diminished health." - United States Department of Labor

    Get more information on chiropractic medicine >>  
     

    Experience

    Having any experience in the chiropractic would prove very valuable. It will allow you to decide if the career is the best for you, as well as show interested chiropractic schools that you are committed and have knowledge about the field.

    Application

    There is no centralized application service for chiropractic schools. You will need to apply to each of the chiropractic schools in which you are interested.

    Letters of Recommendation

    Count on being able to provide at least 3 letters of recommendation. The specific school to which you apply may request letters from certain individuals - professors, employers, advisors, etc.

    Personal Statement

    Some schools may request a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a chiropractor. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the field.

    Chiropractic Schools

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Dental

    What is Dental Medicine?

    "Dentists diagnose and treat problems with teeth and tissues in the mouth, along with giving advice and administering care to help prevent future problems. They provide instruction on diet, brushing, flossing, the use of fluorides, and other aspects of dental care. They remove tooth decay, fill cavities, examine x rays, place protective plastic sealants on children's teeth, straighten teeth, and repair fractured teeth. They also perform corrective surgery on gums and supporting bones to treat gum diseases. Dentists extract teeth and make models and measurements for dentures to replace missing teeth. They also administer anesthetics and write prescriptions for antibiotics and other medications." - United States Department of Labor

    Get information on dental medicine >>  
     

    Qualifying Exams

    All dental schools require the DAT, the Dental Admissions Test.

    Experience

    Experience in the dental field is also required for most dental schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    For more information about how you can gain experience in the medical field, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Application

    To apply for dental school, you need to fill out the AADSAS (the Associated American Dental Schools Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected. It may take up to two (2) weeks for the materials you submit to be sent out.

    Letters of Recommendation

    You will need at least three letters of recommendation, which will usually come from professors, employers, supervisors, or dental professions with whom you have worked. ASU has a pre-professional committee that will collate these letters and send them, along with an overall evaluation, partly based on an interview, to your requested dental schools.

    For further information, contact our pre-professional advisor.

    Personal Statement

    You will need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a dentist. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the dental field.

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Dental Hygiene

    What is dental hygiene?

    "Dental hygienists remove soft and hard deposits from teeth, teach patients how to practice good oral hygiene, and provide other preventive dental care. They examine patients' teeth and gums, recording the presence of diseases or abnormalities." - United States Department of Labor

    Degree Requirements

    Most dental hygiene schools do not require a bachelor's degree. However, dental hygiene school is very competitive, and a bachelor's degree would go a long way to increase your likelihood of acceptance. Additionally, if either you do not get accepted or you choose a different career path later, a bachelor's degree would give you other avenues of interest to pursue. There is no one ideal degree, though most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry. Dental hygiene schools favor diverse interests, and having a minor increases your marketability and shows a range of interests and abilities. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, and General Business.

    Experience

    Having experience in the dental field of any kind would prove very valuable. It will allow you to decide if the career is the best for you, as well as show interested dental hygiene schools that you are committed and have knowledge about the field.

    Application

    There is no centralized application service for dental hygiene schools. You will need to apply to each of the dental hygiene schools in which you are interested.

    Letters of Recommendation

    Count on being able to provide at least 3 letters of recommendation. The specific school to which you apply may request letters from certain individuals - professors, employers, advisors, etc.

    Personal Statement

    Some dental hygiene schools may request a personal statement,a very important description of why you want to become a dental hygienist. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the dental hygiene field.

    Dental Hygiene Schools

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Medical

    What does medical practice mean?

    "Physicians and surgeons diagnose illnesses and prescribe and administer treatment for people suffering from injury or disease. Physicians examine patients, obtain medical histories, and order, perform, and interpret diagnostic tests. They counsel patients on diet, hygiene, and preventive healthcare."

    "There are two types of physicians: M.D. (Medical Doctor) and D.O. (Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine). M.D.s also are known as allopathic physicians. While both M.D.s and D.O.s may use all accepted methods of treatment, including drugs and surgery, D.O.s place special emphasis on the body's musculoskeletal system, preventive medicine, and holistic patient care. D.O.s are most likely to be primary care specialists although they can be found in all specialties. About half of D.O.s practice general or family medicine, general internal medicine, or general pediatrics."

    "Physicians work in one or more of several specialties, including, but not limited to, anesthesiology, family and general medicine, general internal medicine, general pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and surgery." - United States Department of Labor

    The MCAT

    The MCAT, the Medical College Admissions Test, is the entry exam for medical schools. The core classes (Biology, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics, and English) will help you prepare for it.

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all medical schools require a completed bachelor’s degree, and while there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry. Medical schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, General Business, and Psychology.

    Experience

    Experience in the medical field is also required for most medical schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    For more information about how you can gain experience in the medical field, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Application

    To apply for medical school, you need to fill out the AMCAS (the American Medical College Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected.

    Get more information about the AMCAS >>  
     

    Most schools look at students holistically, the most important part of an application is the Committee Recommendation, followed by the MCAT score.

    Letters of Recommendation

    With your application, you will need three letters of recommendation from faculty, with at least two of those letters coming from science faculty. Those letters should be directed to Ronald Johnson, Biological Sciences. Letters of recommendation from non-faculty are acceptable but should be limited to a maximum of two and should be from individuals you know quite well. ASU has a pre-professional committee that will collate these letters and send them, along with an overall evaluation, partly based on an interview, to your requested medical schools. The interview is held during September and October of your Senior year.

    For further information, contact our pre-professional advisor.

    Personal Statement

    You will need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a doctor. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the medical field.

    Personal Characteristics

    It is very important to be well-rounded; the selection committee favors students who participate in extracurricular activities, who are good communicators with effective interpersonal skills, good leadership skills and professionalism, and those who show a genuine care for people and a love of life. They search for individuals who have enriching life experiences, who have an obvious personal integrity, emotional maturity, depth of character, and ethical and moral integrity, and it is not uncommon for schools to do background checks on applicants they are seriously considering. Many schools also look favorably upon students who engage in undergraduate research opportunities, who seek opportunities to better themselves and their community. Individuals who have actively sought opportunities to work in the medical field, either through a job or a volunteer program, are highly considered. Consistent, extended volunteer work is a critical factor in many of their decisions.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future physicians, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as the medical profession (current controversial medical issues, e.g. the Health care system, stem cell research, etc.) and the specific university to which you are applying (their specialties, particular faculty, etc.). Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be a doctor?” “What is the most important issue in medicine today?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    Contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Medical Schools

    There is one medical school (allopathic) in the state of Arkansas - UAMS in Little Rock and one Osteopathic school – NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine in Jonesboro.

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Optometry

    What is optometry?

    "Optometrists, also known as doctors of optometry, or ODs, are the main providers of vision care. They examine people's eyes to diagnose vision problems, such as nearsightedness and farsightedness, and they test patients' depth and color perception and ability to focus and coordinate the eyes. Optometrists may prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses, or they may provide other treatments, such as vision therapy or low-vision rehabilitation." [United States Department of Labor]

    Regional Schools

    To create your four year plan, contact a pre-professional advisor.

    The OAT

    All optometry schools require the OAT, the Optometry Admissions Test.

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all optometry schools require a completed bachelor’s degree, and while there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry, with Biology being strongly favored. Optometry schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, and General Business.

    Experience

    Experience in the optometry field is also required for most optometry schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    For more information about how you can gain experience in the optometry field, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Application

    To apply for optometry school, you need to fill out the OptomCAS (the Optometry College Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected . It may take several weeks for the materials you submit to be prepared to send out.

    Get more information on the OptomCAS >>  
     

    Letters of Recommendation

    You will also need at least three letters of recommendation, which will usually come from professors, employers, supervisors, or optometry professionals with whom you have worked.

    Personal Statement

    You will also need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become an optometrist. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the optometry field.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future optometrists, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as issues in the pharmacy profession (current controversial issues, e.g. the Health care system, stem cell research, etc.) and the specific university to which you are applying (their specialties, particular faculty, etc.). Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be an optometrist?” “What are your life goals?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    For interview practice, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Optometry Schools

    Because there is no optometry school in Arkansas, the Arkansas Department of Higher Education awards grants to qualified students so that they can attend out-of-state schools. To find out what optometry schools are available to you, click here and scroll down to "Arkansas Health Education Grant."

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Pharmacy

    What is pharmacy?

    Pharmacists distribute prescription drugs to individuals. They also advise their patients, physicians, and other health practitioners on the selection, dosages, interactions, and side effects of medications, as well as monitor the health and progress of those patients to ensure that they are using their medications safely and effectively. Compounding—the actual mixing of ingredients to form medications—is a small part of a pharmacist's practice, because most medicines are produced by pharmaceutical companies in standard dosages and drug delivery forms. Most pharmacists work in a community setting, such as a retail drugstore, or in a healthcare facility, such as a hospital." [United States Department of Labor]

    Get more information on pharmacy >>  

    The PCAT

    Most pharmacy schools require the PCAT, the Pharmacy College Admissions Test.

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all pharmacy schools require a completed bachelor’s degree, and while there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry, with Chemistry being the strong favorite. Some schools have a 3-3 agreement, where after 3 years of undergraduate work, you enter pharmacy school, using your first year of pharmacy classes as your electives to finish your degree. A bachelor's degree has not always been required, but most schools now will not accept anyone with fewer than 3 years of experience, and even then, they require a 3-3 agreement. Pharmacy schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, General Business, and Psychology.

    Experience

    Experience in the pharmaceutical field is also required for most pharmacy schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify a certain number of required hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    For more information about how you can gain experience in the pharmaceutical field, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Application

    To apply for pharmacy school, you need to fill out the PharmCAS (the Pharmacy College Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected. It takes approximately 5 weeks for the materials you submit to be prepared to send out.

    Get more information about the PharmCAS >>  
     

    Letters of Recommendation

    With your application, you will also need at least three letters of recommendation, which will usually come from professors, employers, supervisors, or pharmacy professions with whom you have worked.

    Personal Statement

    You will also need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a pharmacist. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the pharmaceutical field.

    Personal Characteristics

    It is very important to be well-rounded; the selection committee favors students who participate in extracurricular activities, good communicators with effective interpersonal skills, good leadership skills and professionalism, and those who show a genuine care for people and a love of life. They search for individuals who have enriching life experiences, with an obvious personal integrity, emotional maturity, depth of character, and ethical and moral integrity, and it is not uncommon for schools to do background checks on applicants they are seriously considering. Many schools also look favorably upon students who engage in undergraduate research opportunities, who seek opportunities to better themselves and their community. Individuals who have actively sought opportunities to work in the pharmaceutical field, either through a job or a volunteer program, are highly considered. Consistent, extended volunteer work is a critical factor in many of their decisions.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future pharmacists, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as issues in the pharmacy profession (current controversial issues, e.g. the Health care system, stem cell research, etc.) and the specific university to which you are applying (their specialties, particular faculty, etc.). Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be a pharmacist?” “What are your life goals?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    For interview practice, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Pharmacy Schools

    There are two pharmacy schools in the state of Arkansas: UAMS - Little Rock, and Harding - Searcy.

    Most schools require a minimum of a 2.5 GPA, however some require a 2.75 or higher. Check with each school to see what their GPA requirements are for admissions.

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Physical Therapy

    What is physical therapy?

    "Physical therapists, sometimes referred to as simply PTs, are healthcare professionals who diagnose and treat individuals of all ages, from newborns to the very oldest, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions, illnesses, or injuries that limits their abilities to move and perform functional activities as well as they would like in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual and develop a plan using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles." [United States Department of Labor]

    Get more information on physical therapy >>  
     

    The GRE

    A-State's Physical Therapy Department does not require the GRE (the Graduate Record Examination - General Knowledge test). Schools that do require it set a minimum composite score of around 900, with an average accepted score around 1100 or in the top 70th percentile. The GRE can be taken as many times as you would like, for they usually take the highest score from each section (creating a "super score").

    Get more information about the GRE >>               Register for the GRE >>  

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all physical therapy schools require a bachelor’s degree. While there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science, Exercise Science, or Athletic Training. Physical therapy schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Chemistry, Spanish, General Business, and Psychology.

    Experience

    Experience in the physical therapy field is also required for most schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    For more information about how you can gain experience in the medical field, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Application

    To apply for physical therapy school, you need to fill out the PTCAS (the Physical Therapy College Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected.

    Get more information about the PTCAS >>

    Letters of Recommendation

    With your application, you will need at least three letters of recommendation, with at least one from a licensed physical therapist (if not more). Additional letters may come from previous employers or professors.

    Personal Statement

    You will need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a physical therapist. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the field of physical therapy.

    Personal Characteristics

    It is very important to be well-rounded; the selection committee favors students who participate in extracurricular activities, who are good communicators with effective interpersonal skills, good leadership skills and professionalism, and those who show a genuine care for people and a love of life. They search for individuals who have enriching life experiences, who have an obvious personal integrity, emotional maturity, depth of character, and ethical and moral integrity, and it is not uncommon for schools to do background checks on applicants they are seriously considering. Many schools also look favorably upon students who engage in undergraduate research opportunities, who seek opportunities to better themselves and their community. Individuals who have actively sought opportunities to work in the physical therapy field, either through a job or a volunteer program, are highly considered. Consistent, extended volunteer work is a critical factor in many of their decisions.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future physical therapists, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as the physical therapy profession (current controversial medical issues, e.g. the Health care system) and the specific school to which you are applying. Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be a physical therapist?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    For interview practice, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Visit the A-State Physical Therapy page >>

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Physician Assistant

    What is a physician assistant?

    "Physician assistants (PAs) practice medicine under the supervision of physicians and surgeons. They should not be confused with medical assistants, who perform routine clinical and clerical tasks. PAs are formally trained to provide diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive healthcare services, as delegated by a physician. Working as members of a healthcare team, they take medical histories, examine and treat patients, order and interpret laboratory tests and x rays, and make diagnoses. They also treat minor injuries by suturing, splinting, and casting. PAs record progress notes, instruct and counsel patients, and order or carry out therapy. Physician assistants also may prescribe certain medications. In some establishments, a PA is responsible for managerial duties, such as ordering medical supplies or equipment and supervising medical technicians and assistants." - United States Department of Labor

    Get more information on physician assistants >>  
     

    Regional Schools

    To create your four year plan, contact a pre-professional advisor.

    Qualifying Exams

    There is no established exam required for all physician’s assistant programs. However, many programs require the GRE, the Graduate Record Examination – specifically, the General Knowledge test.

    Get more information about the GRE >>

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all physician assistant schools require a completed bachelor’s degree and while there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry. Physician's Assistant schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, General Business, and Psychology.

    Experience

    Experience in the medical field (specifically shadowing a physician’s assistant) is also required for most schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours, ranging between 30 to 2000 hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    Application

    To apply for physician assistant schools, you need to fill out the CASPA (Central Application Service for Physician Assistants), which may take 2-4 weeks to process. Different schools have different deadlines.

    Get more information about the CASPA >>

    Letters of Recommendation

    You will need at least three letters of recommendation, which will usually come from professors, employers, supervisors, or medical professionals with whom you have worked.

    Personal Statement

    You will need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a physician assistant. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the medical field.

    Personal Characteristics

    It is very important to be well-rounded; the selection committee favors students who participate in extracurricular activities, who are good communicators with effective interpersonal skills, good leadership skills and professionalism, and those who show a genuine care for people and a love of life. They search for individuals who have enriching life experiences, who have an obvious personal integrity, emotional maturity, depth of character, and ethical and moral integrity, and it is not uncommon for schools to do background checks on applicants they are seriously considering. Many schools also look favorably upon students who engage in undergraduate research opportunities, who seek opportunities to better themselves and their community. Individuals who have actively sought opportunities to work in the medical field, either through a job or a volunteer program, are highly considered. Consistent, extended volunteer work is a critical factor in many of their decisions.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future physicians, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as the medical profession (current controversial issues, e.g. the Health care system, stem cell research, etc.) and the specific university to which you are applying (their specialties, particular faculty, etc.). Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be a physician’s assistant?” “What is the most important issue in medicine today?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    For interview practice, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information

  • Pre-Veterinary

    What is veterinary medicine?

    "Veterinarians diagnose and treat diseases and dysfunctions of animals. Specifically, they care for the health of pets, livestock, and animals in zoos, racetracks, and laboratories. Some veterinarians use their skills to protect humans against diseases carried by animals and conduct clinical research on human and animal health problems. Others work in basic research, broadening our knowledge of animals and medical science, and in applied research, developing new ways to use knowledge." [United States Department of Labor]

    Get more information on veterinary medicine >>

    Qualifying Examinations

    Almost all veterinary schools require the GRE, the Graduate Record Examination. There are two kinds of tests: the General Knowledge test, which most will accept, and the Biology Subject test, which some require in addition. Some schools, however, will accept an MCAT (Medical College Admissions Test) score.

    Get more information about the GRE >>

    Some veterinary schools accept the MCAT, the Medical College Admissions Test. The core classes (Biology, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physics, and English) will help you prepare for it.

    Learn more about the MCAT >>

    Degree Requirements

    Almost all veterinary schools require a completed bachelor’s degree, and while there is no one ideal degree, most students earn a degree in either Biological Science or Chemistry. Our College of Agriculture and Technology offers a Pre-Vet emphasis under Animal Science. For more information about that program, click here. Veterinary schools favor diverse interests. Some common minors include Biological Science, Chemistry, Spanish, General Business, and Animal Science.

    Experience

    Experience in the veterinary field is also required for most veterinary schools, and it is recommended that all students have at least one year of consistent related work, though some specify required hours, ranging between 180 to 600 hours. Volunteer work is highly favored.

    Application

    To apply for veterinary school, you need to fill out the VMCAS (the Veterinary Medical College Application Service), which will then be submitted to the schools you have selected. It is wise to begin collecting materials the summer before your senior year and submit your application as early as possible.

    Get more information about the VMCAS >>

    Letters of Recommendation

    You will need at least three letters of recommendation, which will usually come from professors, employers, supervisors, or veterinary professionals with whom you have worked.

    Personal Statement

    You will need a personal statement, a very important description of why you want to become a veterinarian. This is often the very first thing that application committees review and needs to convey your depth of character and your passion and desire for a career in the veterinary field.

    Personal Characteristics

    It is very important to be well-rounded; the selection committee favors students who participate in extracurricular activities, good communicators with effective interpersonal skills, good leadership skills and professionalism, and those who show a genuine care for animals and a love of life. They search for individuals who have enriching life experiences, with an obvious personal integrity, emotional maturity, depth of character, and ethical and moral integrity, and it is not uncommon for schools to do background checks on applicants they are seriously considering. Many schools also look favorably upon students who engage in undergraduate research opportunities, who seek opportunities to better themselves and their community. Individuals who have actively sought opportunities to work in the veterinary field, either through a job or a volunteer program, are highly considered. Consistent, extended volunteer work is a critical factor in many of their decisions.

    The Interview

    After you apply, you may be asked for an interview with their admissions committee. Selection for an interview is based on an appraisal of intellectual and personal characteristics that are desirable for future pharmacists, taking into account both academic success and extracurricular involvement. It is very important that you are prepared for it: arrive early, dress appropriately (no strong smells), be enthusiastic and positive, and don’t be nervous. Make sure you know the materials you submitted, and be able to address topics such as issues in the veterinary profession (current controversial issues, e.g. stem cell research) and the specific university to which you are applying (their specialties, particular faculty, etc.). Practice having friends and family ask you questions that may come up, such as, “Why do you want to be a veterinarian?” “What are your life goals?” and “What is the worst thing that has ever happened to you?”

    For interview practice, contact our pre-health professional recruiter.

    Because there is no veterinary school in Arkansas, the Arkansas Department of Higher Education awards grants to qualified students so that they can attend out-of-state schools. To find out what veterinary schools are available to you, click here and scroll down to "Arkansas Health Education Grant."

    Veterinary Schools

    Contact a Pre-Professional advisor in the SMART Center for more information


UAMS Summer Science Program

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors

Spend 8 weeks shadowing physicians, attending rounds and clinics, touring different hospital units, and participating in a mentored research project involving children.


Learn more >>